KIDS COUNT


The Center for Public Policy Priorities is the Texas home to KIDS COUNT, a national and state-by-state effort to track the status of children in the U.S. funded by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. In addition to publishing annual reports, the center also offers access to an interactive, comprehensive database of county-by-county and state data on child well-being.


Recent KIDS COUNT Publications

With One of Every 11 Kids Calling Texas Home, New Report Ranks State Low for Child Well-Being (07/25/2012)


KIDSCOUNT Data Center

Texas ranks 44th among the states in overall child health and well-being, according to data released today by the Annie E. Casey Foundation in its 2012 KIDS COUNT Data Book.

Click here to the full presentation on the KIDS Count Data Book.

Click here to access our webinar recording on the KIDS COUNT Data Book (audio and visual).

Choices: The Texas We Create | 2012 State of Texas Children Data Book (04/5/2012)

The 2012 data book explores how our kids have fared during the last decadeâ€"some outcomes are positive, some negative. But positive or negative outcomes for kids don’t just happen. They are the inevitable results of effective or failed policy choices. The State of Texas Children 2012 combines data and policy to tell the story of Texas kids. It’s time we learn from our past choices, positive and negative, so that we can shape a different story for our future.

KIDS COUNT Data Snapshot on Children Living in High-Poverty Communities (02/23/2012)

KIDS COUNT Data Snaphot

In its first data snapshot of the year, the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s KIDS COUNT explores the increased number of children living in America's high-poverty communities. Texas has the 4th highest number of children living in areas with 30 percent of residents or more living below the poverty line at 17 percent. And of the 20 cities with the highest rate of concentrated poverty, three are located here in Texas: El Paso, Dallas, and Houston.

2011 National Kids Count Data Book release (08/17/2011)

KIDSCOUNT Data Center

Texas once again ranks in the bottom third of states in a state-by-state study of our children's well-being, according to the 2011 National Kids Count Data Book, released August 17, 2011, by the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

This year’s data book, "America's Children, America's Challenge: Promoting Opportunity for the Next Generation," examines how children and families are faring in the wake of the recession and proposes a two-generation strategy: strengthening families in order to support children now and create opportunities for the future.

Texas’ Child Population: More Kids, More Diversity, More Responsibility (06/15/2011)

Every 10 years, the U.S. Census Bureau counts every man, woman, and child to track the growth of our national, state, and local populations. Between 2000 and 2010, Texas’ total population grew at twice the national rate to more than 25 million people. A large part of Texas’ growth is due our child population, which grew by 16 percent to 6.9 million children. This report examines the newest census data and describes how Texas’ child population changes are as varied as the state itself, differing depending on whether they live in urban or rural areas and their race/ethnicity. These changes are discussed in the context of our ongoing revenue struggle to find enough money to fund our basic needs now and plan for our future.

The State of Texas Children 2011 (02/9/2011)

On February 4, the Center for Public Policy Priorities (CPPP) released the 18th annual Texas KIDS COUNT data book, The State of Texas Children 2011.

The annual data book and free data warehouse provide the latest look at more than 80 different measures of child well-being in Texas and every county in the state. A new mobile site, www.tkcmobile.org, provides easy access to county-level KIDS COUNT data on the go.

Press Release: New Report, Analysis Show State Will Invest $10 Billion Less in Kids Even as Their Needs Rise (02/3/2011)

(AUSTIN, Texas) â€" A new report and analysis released today by the Center for Public Policy Priorities (CPPP) shows in the wake of a massive revenue shortfall the proposed state budget will invest $10 billion less in Texas kids over the next two years, even while more of the state's children live in poverty, have no health insurance, and are born too early and too small. The state is approximately $27 billion short of what it needs to write a budget that funds all essential services at current levels.

Texas vs. the U.S.: How do our kids fare? (07/27/2010)

Texas ranks in the bottom third of statesâ€"34th nationallyâ€"in a state-by-state study of our children’s well-being, according to the 2010 KIDS COUNT Data Book. The study reveals that Texas has the third highest teen birth rate in the nation, and a child poverty rate well above the rest of the U.S.

CPPP Presentation on the State of Texas Children vs. the U.S.: Don't Miss It! (07/22/2010)

KIDSCOUNT Data CenterThe Honorable Mark Strama, his wife Crystal Cotti, and Texas KIDS COUNT Director Dr. Frances Deviney take an honest look at the well-being of Texas children at a briefing on Tuesday, July 27 from 10-11 a.m. Dr. Deviney will highlight new national KIDS COUNT data comparing Texas kids to children across the nation. This data comes at a critical time when Texans are just beginning to discover the devastating effects of the recession on child well-being, and state lawmakers are grappling with one of the largest budget shortfalls in our state's history.

Presentation and Audio Slideshow from Harris County KIDS COUNT Briefing Now Online (06/15/2010)

The presentation delivered by CPPP KIDS COUNT Director Dr. Frances Deviney during our Harris County KIDS COUNT briefing to honor outgoing CPPP board members Deacon Joe Rubio and Sherea McKenzie is now available online, as well a slideshow featuring photos and audio recorded at the event.

2010 Special KIDS COUNT Report: Why Reading by the End of Third Grade Matters (05/18/2010)

The CPPP is pleased to join the Annie E. Casey Foundation as a 2010 KIDS COUNT Special Report Outreach Partner.

The special report, "Why Reading by the End of Third Grade Matters," makes the case that reading proficiently by grade three is a fundamental benchmark in developmental success and overall childhood well-being. Please visit the online Data Center, where you can download the report and create maps, graphs, and charts of education data at national and local levels.

The State of Texas Children 2009-10 Now Available Online (04/14/2010)

On February 12, the Center for Public Policy Priorities released The State of Texas Children: Texas KIDS COUNT Annual Data Book 2009-2010, a resource that offers an updated look at the well-being of children in Texas, as well as complete online data snapshots for every county in Texas. In addition to hard copies of the book, which can be purchased online for $12, pdf copies of the book are now available for free on our website.

Texas Children: The Real Winners of Health Care Reform (04/13/2010)

Much of the health care reform reporting these past few weeks has focused on political winners and losers. But parents are more concerned with their own families than with political score-keeping. And let's be clear: The reform plan passed by Congress is a major victory for Texas’ children and families.

CPPP, KIDS COUNT on Texas Public Radio's The Newsmaker Hour (03/22/2010)

Last month, CPPP KIDS COUNT director Dr. Frances Deviney debuted "The State of Texas Children 2009-10" factbook with a presentation on child well-being at the University of Texas-San Antonio's downtown campus.

Texas Public Radio producer Ernie Villarreal was there, and his reportâ€"The March 19, 2010 edition of KSTX's The Newsmaker Hourâ€"is now available online.

Count Every Child So That Every Child Counts (02/24/2010)

Once every ten years, every man, woman, and child in America is counted. Families with young children are the most at risk of being undercounted in the Census because these families either don’t understand the importance of the Census or fear what can happen if they do complete it. This can result in the state getting less funding and resources for vital service programs in the communities such as yours. To learn more, click here to view and listen to our webinar.

The State of Texas and Bexar County Children: PowerPoint Presentation (02/24/2010)

Did you miss the release of The State of Texas Children 2009-10 data book in San Antonio on February 12, 2010? Want some great state and Bexar County graphics for a presentation or report? Download our PowerPoint presentation to learn more about child poverty, hunger, health care, and state and federal funding that supports the children who are in greatest need.

The State of Texas Children 2009-10 (02/15/2010)

On February 12, the Center for Public Policy Priorities released The State of Texas Children: Texas KIDS COUNT Annual Data Book 2009-2010, a resource that offers an updated look at the well-being of children in Texas, as well as complete online data snapshots for every county in Texas. This year’s data book chronicles how decades of state fiscal belt-tightening have squeezed off investment in child well-being in Texas, noting that even though federal stimulus dollars filled the gaps in the 2010-2011 state budget, resulting in a slight increase in state spending on services to children, Texas still ranks among the 10 states with the highest rate of child poverty in the nation, as it has for every year since 2000. Furthermore, the most current data available does not yet reflect the effects of the economic recession which hit Texas children and families much later than the rest of the country.

The State of Texas Children: Breakfast Briefing (01/14/2010)

Join Dr. Harriett Romo, Director, UTSA CAPRI/Mexico Center, and Frances Deviney, Ph.D., Texas Kids Count Director, for a breakfast briefing on the well-being of children in San Antonio, Bexar County, and across Texas.

Counting What Counts (09/15/2009)

New Census Bureau data shows that for the 10th year in a row, Texas has the highest rate of uninsured children in the country, with one of every six kids uninsured. Nearly one of every four Texas kids lived in poverty in 2008 (e.g., $17,600 for a family of three).

National 2009 KIDS COUNT Data Book Shows Economic Security, Infant Health Major Challenges for Texas Children (07/28/2009)

Texas ranks in the bottom third of states (34th of 50) on child well-being in a study released today by the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

The national 2009 KIDS COUNT Data Book reveals that compared to 2000, in 2007 more Texas children lived in economically insecure families and key indicators of infant health worsened. These data are particularly troubling because, while they represent most updated information available, they were gathered prior to the current economic recessionâ€"meaning these indicators of child well-being will likely continue to worsen as the data catches up with our recent harsh economic realities.

Texas KIDS COUNT Reports Highlight Health, Well-Being of Hidalgo County and Border-Area Children Compared to Other Texas Children (05/15/2009)

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McAllen, Texas--Texas KIDS COUNT, a project of the Austin-based Center for Public Policy Priorities, today released two reports detailing the well-being of Hidalgo County and border-area children and comparing them to other Texas children. Texas KIDS COUNT Director Dr. Frances Deviney unveiled the reports at a lunch event at South Texas College.

“Texas border counties show the state’s promise, but also the eventual cost of current policy choices. If historic inequities persist, we can expect a less-healthy, less-educated, poor population in greater need of social services but with fewer resources to provide them. On the other hand, implementing the right policies now will fortify the physical, social, emotional and educational development of border children, yielding better-prepared, more competitive workers, increased private and public resources, and a better life for all Texans.” Deviney said.

Texas KIDS COUNT Reports Highlight Health, Well-Being of El Paso and Border-Area Children Compared to Other Texas Children (05/8/2009)

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El Paso, Texas--Texas KIDS COUNT, a project of the Austin-based Center for Public Policy Priorities, today released two reports detailing the well-being of El Paso and border-area children and comparing them to other Texas children. Texas KIDS COUNT Director Dr. Frances Deviney unveiled two reports, collectively titled Texas KIDS COUNT: Our Border, Our Future, at a breakfast event at La Fe Cultural & Technology Center.

“Texas border counties show the state’s promise, but also the eventual cost of current policy choices. If historic inequities persist, we can expect a less-healthy, less-educated, poor population in greater need of social services but with fewer resources to provide them. On the other hand, implementing the right policies now will fortify the physical, social, emotional and educational development of border children, yielding better-prepared, more competitive workers, increased private and public resources, and a better life for all Texans.” Deviney said.

Good Debt, Bad Debt, and Upward Mobility: An Analysis of San Antonio's West Side Families (04/13/2009)

The Center for Public Policy Priorities and the Annie E. Casey Foundation share the belief that to secure positive futures for children, we must help their families and communities provide the needed resources and supportive environments. This paper analyzes the data collected by Making Connections-San Antonio about the debt, credit, and assets of low-income families living in the West Side of San Antonio, Texas. Based on these data, we recommend policies to increase savings rates and provide low-income, urban families in Texas access to short-term capital to meet unexpected needs while creating a regulatory environment for credit services, including payday loans and automobile title loans.

The State of Texas Children 2008-09 (12/11/2008)

KIDS COUNT Databook Logo

The Center for Public Policy Priorities today released The State of Texas Children: Texas KIDS COUNT Annual Data Book 2008-09, a resource that provides the latest look at the well-being of children in Texas and for every county in the state. This year's data book includes a special essay on “Closing the Educational Gaps,” revealing that community and statewide factors play a pivotal role in a child's academic achievement.

A Child Alone and Without Papers (11/13/2008)

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A Child Alone and Without Papers, released today by the Center for Public Policy Priorities (CPPP), reveals what happens to more than 43,000 undocumented, unaccompanied children removed annually from the United States and repatriated to their home countries. Policy analysis and interviews with adults and children in the system revealed the U.S. often compromises children’s rights, safety, and well-being, contrary to international law and U.S. child welfare standards.

For more information, including a two-page summary, backgrounders and appendices, visit www.cppp.org/repatriation.

National Report: Conditions Improving for Texas Teens (06/12/2008)

Conditions for teens are looking brighter in Texas, as the teen death rate, teen birth rate, and percent of teens not attending school and not working have improved. This is according to the KIDS COUNT Data Book, a national state-by-state report released today by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. The report is a precursor to the fall release of The State of Texas Children 2008, which will provide child well-being data for every county in Texas.

New Report: Statewide, Some Areas of Maternal & Child Health Improving (11/19/2007)

According to the newly released State of Texas Children 2007, statewide, more women are receiving prenatal care and teen births are continuing to decline, while babies born at low birthweight and infant mortality rates are worsening. The report, released by the Austin-based Center for Public Policy Priorities (CPPP), provides the latest look at the well-being of children in Texas and for every county in the state. “The report finds that when it comes to maternal and child health, Texas has much to be thankful for,” said Frances Deviney, Texas KIDS COUNT Director. “At the same time, work remains in other areas. Statewide, low birthweight and infant mortality rates have increased, child poverty is up for the fifth straight year, unemployment has increased, and Texas continues to have the highest rates of uninsured children in the nation.”

The State of Texas Children 2007 (11/19/2007)

CPPP has released The State of Texas Children 2007, our annual KIDS COUNT data book on the well-being of children in every county in Texas. Among this year’s findings, statewide, maternal and infant health are improving, as more women are receiving prenatal care and teen births are continuing to decline. At the same time, child poverty is up for the fifth straight year, unemployment has increased, and Texas continues to have the highest rates of uninsured children in the nation. The full report is not available online. To buy a hard copy, visit http://www.cppp.org/factbook07/data_book.php

Texas Needs to Rank Kids No. 1 on its List of Priorities: Austin American-Statesman (08/15/2007)

The University of Texas football team is gearing up for the 2007-08 season. One preliminary poll ranks the team as high as third in the nation, much to the delight of Longhorns fans across the state. Another set of rankings, released earlier this week, paints a much more dismal portrait of Texasâ€"Texas kids, that is. According to the 2007 KIDS COUNT Databook, Texas ranks 37thâ€"just 13 from the bottomâ€"in overall child well being.

National Report: Texas Has the Worst Teen Birth Rate in the Country (07/25/2007)

Texas has the highest teen birth rate in the nation (63 births per 1,000 females ages 15-19) according to the KIDS COUNT Data Book, a national state-by-state report released today by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. This report is a precursor to the fall release of The State of Texas Children 2007, which will provide child well-being data for every county in Texas. Despite improving by 9 percent between 2000 and 2004, Texas has the nation’s worst birth rate, with more than 51,000 births to Texas teens (or 63 births per 1,000 teens). Nationally, there are 41 births for every 1,000 teens.

Celebrate Graduates; Help the Dropouts: San Antonio Express-News (05/26/2007)

This month hundreds of thousands of Texas teens will graduate from high school. Some will go on to four-year colleges. Some will enroll in community colleges or vocational schools. Others will enter the job market. Often overlooked are the tens of thousands of teens who will drop out before earning their diplomas.

The Texas Dropout Crisis: Magnitude and Impact (01/23/2007)

KIDS COUNT Director, Frances Deviney, Ph.D. briefed legislative staff on the costs of the Texas dropout crisis. This presentation was part of a larger panel discussion and included presentations from Children at Risk, the Intercultural Development Research Association (IDRA), Texas Center for Educational Policy at the University of Texas, Texas Appleseed, and the Center for Education at Rice University. All presentations are included in the link below.

Just Released: Report on TX Child Well-Being (11/20/2006)

On Friday, November 17, CPPP released The State of Texas Children 2006 at a breakfast briefing in San Antonio. Texas KIDS COUNT's annual data book provides the latest look at the well-being of children from across the state in such areas as health care, education, and poverty. See below for details on buying the book and Frances Deviney's special San Antonio/Bexar County presentation! To learn how kids in county are doing, visit http://www.cppp.org/factbook06/.

New Report: Teens Doing Better in Texas; Compared to Nation, Texas Teens Engaging in More Risky Behaviors (11/17/2006)

While conditions for teens have improved in Texas, teens statewide are significantly more likely to have sex, drink alcohol, drive drunk, or ride with a drunk driver than teens in other states, according to data compiled in The State of Texas Children 2006. The report, released today by the Austin-based Center for Public Policy Priorities (CPPP), examines the status of children across all of Texas’ 254 counties. To learn how kids in your county are doing, visit http://www.cppp.org/factbook06/.

National Report: Poverty on the Rise in Texas (06/27/2006)

The percentage of kids living in poverty in Texas has increased by 5 percent since 2000. With this increase in poverty comes an increase in infant mortality, low-birthweight babies, and the percentage of babies who are not immunized, according to the KIDS COUNT Data Book, a national report released today by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. This national report is a precursor to the fall release of the Texas KIDS COUNT report that will provide data on child well-being for every county in the state.

New Study Examines Texas’ Dropout Challenge: Graduation Caps or Graduation Gaps? (05/16/2006)

As newspapers across the state publish graduation stories and showcase local students who are off to college, often overlooked are the Texas teens who have dropped out before earning their diplomas. A Texas KIDS COUNT special report, The High Cost of Dropping Out: How Many? How Come? How Much?, released today by the Center for Public Policy Priorities, examines this issue.

The High Cost of Dropping Out: How Many, How Come? How Much? (05/16/2006)

This report, released today, examines Texas' dropout issue. Among the report's findings: If every 9th grader in Fall 2000 graduated from the Texas public school system in Spring 2004, it would have cost Texas an additional $1.7 billion over four years, just for the Class of 2004. At the same time, if every 16-19 year old who is not in school and does not have a high school diploma simply graduated, the state's combined earnings would increase by about $3 billion over four years. In order to help you assess these economic consequences on your community, we have compiled a supplemental county-by-county data spreadsheet.

Texas KIDS COUNT: The State of Fort Worth and Tarrant County Children (03/21/2006)

Frances Deviney presented the latest look at the state of Fort Worth/Tarrant County Children before more than 150 people at a breakfast briefing at the Fort Worth Botanic Gardens.

The Status of Kids on the Texas-Mexico Border (02/25/2006)

KIDS COUNT Director Frances Deviney presented on the status of children on the Texas-Mexico border at at the 10th Annual Conference for the Texas Association of School-Based Health Centers in El Paso.

The State of Texas Children 2005 (11/21/2005)

Get the latest look at the well-being of children across the state. Download it as a PDF file today!

Report: Teens Faring Better in Texas (11/1/2005)

After many years of worsening conditions, teens are faring better in Texas, according to The State of Texas Children 2005, a report released today by the Center for Public Policy Priorities (CPPP) that examines the status of children across all of Texas’ 254 counties.

Presentation: The State of Dallas County Children (11/1/2005)

KIDS COUNT Director Frances Deviney gives the latest look at the state of children in Dallas County.

National Report: Conditions Improving for Texas Teens (07/27/2005)

Although Texas still ranks in the bottom quarter of child well-being nationwide, the good news is that conditions are improving for Texas’ teens, according to the KIDS COUNT Data Book, a national report released today by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. This national report is a precursor to the fall release of the Texas KIDS COUNT report that will provide data for every county in the state.

Houston KIDS COUNT Conference on Children Powerpoint Presentations (06/15/2005)

The following presentations were given at the Houston KIDS COUNT Conference on Children, a half-day conference on children's issues in the wake of the 79th Legislative Session.

Houston KIDS COUNT: A Snapshot of Children Living in Houston and Harris County (06/15/2005)

The Center for Public Policy Priorities (CPPP) is pleased to present the Houston KIDS COUNT data book, a special city/county report produced by the Texas KIDS COUNT project. Houston KIDS COUNT: A Snapshot of Children Living in Houston and Harris County, examines the status of children in Houston and Harris County.

Experts to Release Report on the Status of Houston/Harris County Kids at Conference on Children (06/9/2005)

With school out and the 79th Legislative Session just behind us, the Center for Public Policy Priorities (CPPP) will release the 2005 Texas KIDS COUNT Special Report: A Shapshot of Children Living in Houston and Harris County, before hundreds of child advocates on Wednesday, June 15 at the United Way of Texas Gulf Coast.

Resources on the Well-Being of Children on the Texas Border (02/7/2005)

The Center for Public Policy Priorities worked with the Annie E. Casey Foundation to prepare a series of resources on the well-being of children on the Texas border.

Child Welfare Expert Scott McCown to Release Snapshot of El Paso/Border Kids at Briefing/Community Meeting (02/3/2005)

On Monday, Feb. 7, Scott McCown, Executive Director of the Center for Public Policy Priorities (CPPP)â€"recently named by Texas Monthly as one of the "25 Most Powerful People in Texas Politics”â€"will release Border KIDS COUNT: A Snapshot of Southwest Border Children. An initiative of the Annie E. Casey Foundation, Border KIDS COUNT is the first-ever county-by-county benchmark of child well-being.

A Tale of Two Regions: Rural and Urban Kids Face Similar Challenges (12/9/2004)

Children who live in rural and urban Texas often share the same kinds of problems, barriers, and disconnections, according to the City and Rural KIDS COUNT Data Book, just released by the Center for Public Policy Priorities and the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

The State of Texas Children 2004 (09/1/2004)

The Center for Public Policy Priorities is pleased to present The State of Texas Children 2004. This year we depart from the formats used in prior years. In our 2004 report, we display a key set of measures on child well-being through a series of maps that show how each county compares with others and with the state as a whole. Through text we provide commentary on the data, explain how the reader can access additional data from our comprehensive website, and discuss how the reader can use the data to inform debate and guide decisions about public policy. The data book is also a wall calendar.We encourage you to display it so that you are reminded daily of the work that must be done for our children and as a conversation starter about the needs of our children. The maps on these pages reflect the patterns we are weaving through the loom of public policy. The days on these pages divide time but do not slow its passage. By drawing these maps and marking these days, we hope to increase your sense of urgency about improving the state of Texas children.

2004 State of Texas Children Website (06/13/2004)

All Grown Up, Nowhere to Go: Teens in Foster Care Transition (01/1/2001)

The Texas Foster Care Transitions Project, a research effort conducted by the Center for Public Policy Priorities, provides a first glimpse of a little-known but extremely vulnerable population of young people in Texasâ€" foster youth who have transitioned from the care of the state to independence.

The State of Texas Children 2000 (01/1/2000)

The State of Texas Children: 2000 is part of a series produced by the Texas Kids Count project to report on the status of children and their families in Texas. Texas Kids Count reports are tools used by policymakers, service providers, and advocates to support positive programs and policies for children. Texas Kids Count is unique because it provides detailed profiles about the status of children for every county in the state. This information is used in planning for services and programs at the local level as well as the state level. Texas Kids Count is recognized by planners and policymakers across Texas as the best source of statistics on the well-being of children.

Measuring Up: Parental Involvement in Education (06/28/1999)

This 1999 report explores a various ways parents can be involved in their children's education. This report discusses the importance of parental involvement in education and addresses some of the barriers parents encounter when trying to be involved, as well as what schools can do to promote parental involvement. Finally, a model program is described as a case study for sucess.

Measuring Up: Violence and Weapons in Texas Schools (05/18/1999)

While violence in Texas schools is unacceptably frequent, some types of school violence have declined in recent years - most likely due to programs designed to improve safety in schools and in the community. This 1999 report examines data on juvenile violent crime in Texas as well as the incidence of violence in our schools over recent years. School violence data for each of Texas’ 254 counties are included.

Measuring Up: Early Childhood Education (04/13/1999)

The earliest years of a child's life are crucial in predicting ultimate success in school and life. The Early Childhood and Education Report, released in April of 1999, focuses on the importance of quality early education for children, with an emphasis on low-income children, and provides a case study of a successful early childhood learning program.

Texas KIDS COUNT Report Finds Problems with Dropout Estimation (02/26/1999)

Regardless of methodology, Texas' dropout situation is among the worst in U.S.

Measuring Up: The Debate Over Dropouts (02/22/1999)

Texas has one of the highest dropout rates in the nation - only two states have a higher percentage of students who drop out of high school (Arizona and Nevada). The national Kids Count Project estimates that 13 percent of all Texas' 16-19 year olds are not enrolled in school and not high school graduates. This 1999 report examines the controversies surrounding the definition of “dropout” as well as assessment of data provided by the Texas Education Agency.

Measuring Up: Student Assessment and Performance (11/13/1998)

There are many environmental and social factors that can affect how well students perform in school. This 1998 report focuses on the standards and tests schools used to measure student and school performance, most notably the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAAS) test.

Measuring Up: School Finance (10/22/1998)

Texas has one of the largest and fastest growing school-age populations in the nation. The cost of educating large numbers of students, particularly students with special needs, is increasing dramatically. This 1998 report provides a general overview and background to public school financing in Texas, and how Texas funding compares to other states in the country.

Overview of Texas Education (09/7/1998)

This is the first in a series of reports about public education in Texas. The Overview of Texas Education explores issues in education of Texas children with an emphasis on low-income and disadvantaged children in public schools. This introductory report summarizes many of the challenges faced by students in Texas, as well as challenges faced by the schools they attend.

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