KIDS COUNT


The Center for Public Policy Priorities is the Texas home to KIDS COUNT, a national and state-by-state effort to track the status of children in the U.S. funded by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. In addition to publishing annual reports, the center also offers access to an interactive, comprehensive database of county-by-county and state data on child well-being.


Recent KIDS COUNT Publications

Counting What Counts (09/15/2009)

New Census Bureau data shows that for the 10th year in a row, Texas has the highest rate of uninsured children in the country, with one of every six kids uninsured. Nearly one of every four Texas kids lived in poverty in 2008 (e.g., $17,600 for a family of three).

National 2009 KIDS COUNT Data Book Shows Economic Security, Infant Health Major Challenges for Texas Children (07/28/2009)

Texas ranks in the bottom third of states (34th of 50) on child well-being in a study released today by the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

The national 2009 KIDS COUNT Data Book reveals that compared to 2000, in 2007 more Texas children lived in economically insecure families and key indicators of infant health worsened. These data are particularly troubling because, while they represent most updated information available, they were gathered prior to the current economic recession"meaning these indicators of child well-being will likely continue to worsen as the data catches up with our recent harsh economic realities.

Texas KIDS COUNT Reports Highlight Health, Well-Being of Hidalgo County and Border-Area Children Compared to Other Texas Children (05/15/2009)

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McAllen, Texas--Texas KIDS COUNT, a project of the Austin-based Center for Public Policy Priorities, today released two reports detailing the well-being of Hidalgo County and border-area children and comparing them to other Texas children. Texas KIDS COUNT Director Dr. Frances Deviney unveiled the reports at a lunch event at South Texas College.

“Texas border counties show the state’s promise, but also the eventual cost of current policy choices. If historic inequities persist, we can expect a less-healthy, less-educated, poor population in greater need of social services but with fewer resources to provide them. On the other hand, implementing the right policies now will fortify the physical, social, emotional and educational development of border children, yielding better-prepared, more competitive workers, increased private and public resources, and a better life for all Texans.” Deviney said.

Texas KIDS COUNT Reports Highlight Health, Well-Being of El Paso and Border-Area Children Compared to Other Texas Children (05/8/2009)

Report cover image1

Report cover image1

El Paso, Texas--Texas KIDS COUNT, a project of the Austin-based Center for Public Policy Priorities, today released two reports detailing the well-being of El Paso and border-area children and comparing them to other Texas children. Texas KIDS COUNT Director Dr. Frances Deviney unveiled two reports, collectively titled Texas KIDS COUNT: Our Border, Our Future, at a breakfast event at La Fe Cultural & Technology Center.

“Texas border counties show the state’s promise, but also the eventual cost of current policy choices. If historic inequities persist, we can expect a less-healthy, less-educated, poor population in greater need of social services but with fewer resources to provide them. On the other hand, implementing the right policies now will fortify the physical, social, emotional and educational development of border children, yielding better-prepared, more competitive workers, increased private and public resources, and a better life for all Texans.” Deviney said.

Good Debt, Bad Debt, and Upward Mobility: An Analysis of San Antonio's West Side Families (04/13/2009)

The Center for Public Policy Priorities and the Annie E. Casey Foundation share the belief that to secure positive futures for children, we must help their families and communities provide the needed resources and supportive environments. This paper analyzes the data collected by Making Connections-San Antonio about the debt, credit, and assets of low-income families living in the West Side of San Antonio, Texas. Based on these data, we recommend policies to increase savings rates and provide low-income, urban families in Texas access to short-term capital to meet unexpected needs while creating a regulatory environment for credit services, including payday loans and automobile title loans.

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